Sunday, 5 April 2015

Most People Won't Share this... because African Lives Don't matter!


Most people won't read or share this; don't let this massacre of Students distract you from videos of cats and posts from ladbible... Such is the wasted potential of humanity, since the advent of social media. 

Hi! This blog has now moved to www.antoinespeaks.co.uk please go their to support my new website and new articles; thanks for the support and feedback. Lets keep challenging people to think a little deeper

Before you read or watch; please note I wrote this blog post in April 2015. However, after the recent Paris attacks and many other attacks I have since wrote this(click the link to read): "I will not let terrorist make me afraid and nor should you" 

You are welcome to read both blog posts; Thank you.

Click above and you can now watch me reading and explaining this blog/the title; or carry on reading on for yourself. 


This Week in Kenya, a Massacre of 148 students took place. Students murdered by four armed Terrorists of al-Shaabab. Some were able to survive, leaving us with harrowing stories. Ones such as a man whom smeared blood on himself and hid amongst the bodies of his dead and dying friends. Or others like the woman who hid terrified in cupboard for two days; so scared to come out, that her rescues had to desperately convince her she was safe.

The question becomes; what is surviving and what is safe? These students will have to live on with these terrible memories and experiences. Expectedly, their university remains closed indefinitely. Their future hangs desperately in the balance. Most sadly, they will have to live on in fear each day in a country where Al-Shaabab's militants remain at large and continue their threats of mass-violence.

Spare a moment for the 148 whom did not survive. The clothes of their families will be no less soaked in tears. The screams of their sorrows will echo around the streets, churches, mosques, homes and fields of a their country with no less anguish. 

Yet, the world does what to combat, acknowledge, condole or seek retribution for their murders?

There will be no Foreign leaders photo opportunity or Je suis... hashtag. Most newspapers won't run their tragic deaths on any front page. 
Why? A quick look at Zizek on Violence can explain our western mindset to non-western deaths and/or violence.

"Over the last decade, 4 million people died in the Democratic Republic of Congo - mostly political killings. Time magazine ran a cover story in 2006, titled "The Deadliest War in the World," chronicling this state of affairs.
But there was no uproar, no one took up on it. Comparatively,
The death of a West Bank Palestinian child, not to mention an Israeli or an American, is mediatically worth thousands of times more than the death of a nameless Congolese...
and yet the U.S. media reproaches the public in foreign countries for not displaying enough sympathy for the victims of the 9/11 attacks." Zizek On Violence

Replace 9/11 with the tragic deaths of the Charlie Hedbo staff and we are in the same situation. We ask the world to weep for our loss or a loss close to us, without showing the same sadness or respect to their losses. Or worse, the thousands of lives we have had a hand in creating; from the estimated 1.2million(at least) that have died due to the so called War on Terror. 

Antoine you're wrong! "I do care; i wrote that status about the Charlie Hedbo Attack..."

Well, at the same time as 12 people died in France, there were 12 other terrorist attacks around the world. The most horrific was 2000 or more that died in Nigeria at the hands of Boko Haram. Where was their Je suis hashtags, protests, headlines, posters, vigils, status or tweets.

I say, in 2015 we need to think more as a united humanity rather than 'them and us'.
We need to see their deaths as our deaths.
Their lives as our lives.
We need to move further together instead of drifting further apart. We are socially connected but more disconnected; this banality of violence must stop.

Social media

Check your own timeline; when was the last time you shared something of meaning, positivity or educational.
Check your mind; when was the last time you read a story about someone who didn't look like you, live in your country or wasn't 'famous'?
When was the last time you sat and read a news story from start to finish? 
When was the last time you thought "i won't let this story be forgotten between the posts about cats and selfies"?
When was the the last time you thought someone needs to read this; "The world needs to read, see and act on this"?

A long time? this is because of the Banality of violence. Whereby we choose between whose deaths we care about and whose we don't. Whose lives are worth protesting, weeping and commiserating. There is a buffet of media; we would rather digest the sweet pointless posts and videos, than the news stories and tragedy that leaves a lump in our throat.

A friend asked me why this was the case and why this wasn't major news on all media forms; to use a popular phrase why this hadn't broke the internet?

Well, it could be because they are Black, could be because they are far away or even simply because the media has created a narrative about Africa. That narrative is a place that is uneducated, uncivilised and a conflict zone. Not a place of development, growth, innovation and full of people with hopes, dreams and aspirations just like anywhere else. This media driven narrative means people read stories about Africa and think "that's ok, that happens there all the time". This gives people an excuse not to emphasise. Not to care. Not to share. Not to write that status, tweet or share that post. "Africa and violence is old news". Do these lives not matter? Are we that busy sharing rubbish that we can't take a moment to care for these students?
Look around you, read the news, read your own timeline of friends and you will see we are divided and we are falling. Realistically, we can not change the foreign policy mistakes of the past. However, we can change our personal social and humanitarian thoughts and actions for the unity of today to influence the future of tomorrow.


Only by standing together can we stop this descent into a world, whereby Extremist attacks become more frequent; in a world that becomes more marginalized and narrow minded. A world whereby, we still elect people who do not care or represent our lives. A world whereby, we allow ourselves to be distract by fake realities and celebrate infamy rather than talent. A world whereby, the gap between rich and poor grows each year. A world whereby, a "like" is valued more than real tangible protests, thought provoking, debate, discussion, actions and change!
I don't have the answers, but if we think together, we act together. 
WE CAN COME UP WITH A BETTER ANSWER THAN THE MINORITY THAT KEEP FAILING US AND THE WORLD!

Here are two poems that are poignant in these troubled times.
I often suggest to people that they should read this poem, when someone passes away who is close to them. I think it is still fitting for this tragedy.

Do not stand at my grave and weep 
I am not there. I do not sleep. 
I am a thousand winds that blow. 
I am the diamond glints on snow. 
I am the sunlight on ripened grain. 
I am the gentle autumn rain. 
When you awaken in the morning's hush 
I am the swift uplifting rush 
Of quiet birds in circled flight. 
I am the soft stars that shine at night. 
Do not stand at my grave and cry; 
I am not there. I did not die.
By Mary Frye

RIP to these Students
RIP to the many that will sadly befall a similar fate.
RIP to those who have already befallen such a tragic fate.


THE TEST
Share this post and see if the people you know share it or like it; you will see exactly what i am talking about. Most people will skip past this and watch a funny video instead. Which isn't your fault. At least you tried to be "The change you want to see".

Thank you for reading.
Please follow my blog, youtube, Facebook and/or @AntoineSpeaksOn twitter. Below are some of the generic questions i have had since writing this post.

Questions
Do I have to share this blog? 
No, but share something. Share something of support, something of substance, something that inspires, something that challenges people to do something, care and emphasise. Most of all share your own opinion. I am just one person; just like yourself. My opinion is no better than anyone else's. As an Arab saying goes "The same rain water, grows weeds as well as roses; but the rain remains the same" Most of you reacted 'positively'. Others not so much. Such is life.

Should I stop having fun on the internet/social media?
No, of course not. The internet is a gift. A gift filled with fun, interesting, funny, cute and amazing videos/posts/sites/thoughts. However between the fun stuff, simply take a minute to care. It doesn't have to be every day; but when the time comes. When a story is so bad that the world must react. REACT don't be apathetic, distant and disinterested.

Antoine, saying "Most People" is generalisation; Why don't you feel it devalues your post?
"All generalisations are false; but this to is a generalisation" Someone far smarter than myself said that. If you clicked on the blog you aren't most people. However, if your only reaction to the blog is the title. Not Kenyan deaths, not the world ignoring Congo, not the world picking which deaths matter, not society becoming increasingly distracted by rubbish, not the media driven narrative that Africa is only a place of violence and not the call for you to change either your ways or attempt to inspire the people you know to change theirs. Then you have wasted your time reading this blog. The Title is a call to action. Simple as that. Message me and i will explain the nature of the internet in 2015. Sometimes you have to challenge people to think i.e. The greater good.


If you found this post thought provoking, please read my other relevant posts.

The world is sick... and here's why http://www.antoinespeaks.co.uk/the-hypocrisy-of-a-sick-world/

What if men were treated like women?
http://www.antoinespeaks.co.uk/what-if-the-gender-roles-of-society-were-reversed-this-film-depicts-the-sexism-women-face/


My letter to black boys and the people that raise them http://www.antoinespeaks.co.uk/dear-black-boys-and-the-men-they-will-become/

Antoine Allen
@AntoineSpeakson
""The three c's of life; choice, chance and change. You have to make the choice, to take the chance, if you want anything to change" A. Allen
"





103 comments:

  1. Don't put "most people won't share this", or any variation of, in a serious article. It's insulting. If you want people to carry your message perhaps don't accuse them of being wholly unsympathetic and triviality-obsessed.

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    1. Just to clarify, I don't disagree with your actual message nor the intent.

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    2. I tackled the issue of the title in my own mind. The nature of social media now is you have to provoke a reaction for people to simple read something they should care about in the first place. In reading and sharing you or the reader is proving the title wrong. The title is a call to action. The title is a challenge. Also your point echos the article surely? A lot of people are unsympathetic; but seeing as you are commenting you are not one of them. Yet the wording of the title is the biggest thing you found to comment about...

      But with that said it says MOST PEOPLE not EVERYONE. A person can choose to be most people or be the minority that isn't sharing endless videos of cats and twerking. Thank you for commenting. I am not sure if you will see this reply. But thanks anyway.

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    3. Very true and very obvious.. Rich countries always forget the poor countries and they are not interested . better for them if they kill each other. For them it is better if they kill each other. Why??? the international community now remains inert to the trajedy of the huge humanitarian tragedy 150 students!!!!

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    4. you obviously didn't watch the news yesterday because every political leader spoke out against this

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    5. The title was the reason I did not share this. The title put this into the category of "share this to ten friends, and you will have good luck" chain letters. Many of my friends have shared more intelligent articles about this happening, and I'm from Finland...I think this is completely insulting, and the title is making your message sound pathetic: Most texts that are shared with similar titles, are fake. Seems like you don't want this to be taken seriously? I doubt you wanted to give this impression. Did you really mean that those who find about this sad event first from you, think it's just another fake story written to make people feel bad, and which only the most sad social media slaves share?

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    6. The only reason some of you have clicked on this was due to the title & the only reason some people have shared it is because of the title... that's the actual point. This is the nature of the internet today. I can keep repeating this point to the few people that seem obsessed with a title rather than the content/message... those people notably all post anonymously; also the nature of the internet... Stand by your words if you have something to say.

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    7. I did not click on this article because of your title. I clicked on the link that someone shared with me and then saw the title and then scrolled down to see if everyone else was as offended by this awful chain-letter title as I was. If you want to show respect for the people who died, you don't make your article sound accusatory to "most people" and get them to share it via guilt. You want us to be sympathetic, do it with your writing and with an intelligent title. And you don't act all dismissive of people criticizing your work. Also, including the photographs without adequate warning is disrespectful to the people who died and to your readers. Shame on you. I would have supported this article and shared it gladly to bring awareness.... instead I'll stick to a more respectful news source.

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    8. Fair point about the warning. I apologise for that.
      But the rest of what you said is illogical. You clicked on it because of the title even if your motive was to skip the content to simply read the comment; Surely that thought/action is somewhat self interesting?
      Lets pretend i have viewed many different people whom have shared it. And lets pretend i am fully aware of the title. The title as i have said is a enticing because this story and this opinion needs to be read(i believe). IF you hadn't seen it on your friends timeline you wouldn't be here right now. IF they didn't read it and think i need to share this. Instead of your reaction which was "i need comment on that title" then you wouldn't be here right now...

      Either way as you will see if you watch the accompanying video; share whatever news source keeps this story alive and keeps these people memories alive. You don't have to share my blog. But share something of substance!

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    9. This seems to hint that this is something new and made worse by social media, don't you think? It's interesting how it has changed (or not) since imperialism, it seems to be the same sort of moral detachment that these people don't matter because they are 'the other'. It goes way deeper than cat videos and the media, in my opinion. The narrative has not been created by the media alone, I think the media (at times) even exhaust themselves in an attempt to get people to take notice and feel empathy. The truth is that this sense of 'other' has existed since colonial times, the modern world needed a justification for slavery and various invasions and barbaric acts all over the world, not just Africa. I think the message should be to inform people know how to read outside of this narrative, not berate them for existing in a comfortable bubble.

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    10. This seems to hint that this is something new and made worse by social media, don't you think? It's interesting how it has changed (or not) since imperialism, it seems to be the same sort of moral detachment that these people don't matter because they are 'the other'. It goes way deeper than cat videos and the media, in my opinion. The narrative has not been created by the media alone, I think the media (at times) even exhaust themselves in an attempt to get people to take notice and feel empathy. The truth is that this sense of 'other' has existed since colonial times, the modern world needed a justification for slavery and various invasions and barbaric acts all over the world, not just Africa. I think the message should be to inform people know how to read outside of this narrative, not berate them for existing in a comfortable bubble.

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    11. I totally agree. Yes, it is an outrage that this massacre is largely ignored by 'western' media but titles like this piss me off and I mostly ignore such post, no matter how good a cause they promote. I also totally agree with commentor 6495e546-a4be-11e3-88c7-000bcdcb5194 above.

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    12. People generally are becoming immune to these daily reports of mayhem occurring around the world in one form or another , usually as a direct result or in the name of religious believes . This plays directly into the hands of nations and governments whom it seems are quite content to keep feeding into these fine little wars , in order to be able to send men and equipment to battle these forces of evil ! The process is called culling ( as with seals or deer etc. ) It assists them in lowering their welfare payments to needy countries , while at the same time creating more wealth for the rich . You talk about a screwed up world , if this is George W. Bush's New World Order in process , isn't it time to re-examine the results ??

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    13. we do care about africa in the west but the africans dont care about them self because if they did they would take up arms against there oppressors, just like in nigeria where the goverment dosent do anything about boko haram. clean up your own country.

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    14. The title is definitely a negative. I don't respond to emotional blackmail. I clicked on the link because of the comments made by the friend who posted it on Facebook, not because of the title. The title was a turn off and once I saw it was almost persuaded me not to read further. The fact that you are dismissing everyone who has made the same point shows your lack of understanding. It is also disrespectful to assume that most people only share videos of cats and selfies and don't share anything of substance. That says more about who you are keeping company with.

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  2. Very powerful message but,some people choose to watch uplifting videos because they too are going through or have been through certain hardships. I was born in South Africa and saw my share of deaths and murders up close and personal.It just brings back watching innocent people die before my eyes.Still though,I look at these pictures and videos as a reminder of the terror in this world,had it been the U S or any European country they would be blasting it in the media 24/7.What,because they are not white its o.k?I'm white and to be honest I am often ashamed of it.
    Mr.Antoine you keep doing this because its people like you who speak the truth that will open the eyes of the misguided and disinformed.
    Thank you.

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    1. Thank you for your support. I believe the support needs to be for the cause not me. I am just one man whom turned a status into a blog post and people seem to be responding to what i have said. Well i hope they are.

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  3. Thank you. Thoughts. Silence... Shared. Margriet from Amsterdam, Holland

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    1. Thank you commenting and taking the time to read

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    2. What do u want the world to do? How can i do something besides share this? I have no money or power to fix this so what do u want people like me to do other than share this?

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  4. Not sure how you can say that 'African lives don't matter' when #GarissaAttack is trending globally and on every news outlet I have seen today. Likewise with #bringbackourgirls - most definitely as big (if not bigger) than #Jesuischarlie.

    Some conflicts don't get much coverage but that's rarely to do with race and more to do with our ability to relate to them. We can all identify with the horror of having a child kidnapped or a university student being gunned down, but we struggle to identify with a genocide in Congo, not because they don't matter, but because it seems so distant, so far away. Are all British stories reported on African news? Probably not.

    I think we have to be careful to not turn it into an issue of race/ethnicity. People DO care and the coverage on Social Media today shows that.

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    1. Our ability to relate to a subject in the news is often due to race, nationality and sex. Example, there were stark differences in reactions to the killings of unarmed black men in America. That's not to say non-black people didn't react. But if the reaction were the same Fox News and the Daily Show would have the same narrative.

      But to this blog: I mentioned the 12 other terrorist attacks, at the same time as Charlie Hebdo; the difference in the level of coverage and specifically western reaction to non-western deaths. IF everyone cared as you have put it why did a counter hashtag to Jesuis charlie hedbo appear? Why did many non-western people start to ask where is your outcry out our deaths? I am not the first person to raise this issue. ALSO i say race "could be" a reason. I don't actually say it is the only reason. I wrote a whole paragraph on that particular issue of why...

      You should read Zizek on Violence; specifically subjective and objective violence. It would give you far greater knowledge on subject of empathy to violence.

      Thanks for commenting.

      Delete
  5. Antoine, the events in Kenya have got a lot of attention. People, like myself, do care a lot. One of my best friends was born in Kenya and has family there. I don't think the provocative language ('people won't share' etc) gets you very far - I don't like having my emotions manipulated and would rather just read about the actual events. One starting point (rather than who wants to share what on social media) is that Kenya has some of the highest paid MPs in the world. So we might ask them - are you getting off your fat arses and protecting the people of your country with all your money? Because they are there on the ground in the country, and with more money and influence than I have access to. Attacks like this are very threatening to the whole fabric of sub-Saharan African society, just as the fighting across the Arab world is threatening their entire way of life, so they absolutely deserve an emergency response.

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    1. The title it's self is a call to action; i did explain this to another person. If you read above.

      I have heard that people have complaints with the time the army took to respond and deal with the on-going situation. However, i don't think the level of pay of the MPs would impact on them wanting to protect their people. I am not knowledgable on whether they are overpaid so i can't really give a valuable opinion to that.

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  6. All very well Antoine. What about the atrocities and killing of innocents being committed by the Kenyan Army in Somalia? Kenya invaded Somalia and declared war on Al Shabaab. At least the Garissa killings are being reported, the Kenyan atrocities in Somalia are not. The Somalis are black and Muslim. There are always different levels of hypocrisy.

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    1. I hear that point. I will not pretend to have all the answer to a very complex subject. Hopefully a spotlight will be on the region which will cause people/governments to act within the law

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  7. Antoine, I don't agree with every word of your article, but I am, by and large, with you. African issues are slowly getting more airtime - now that the western press can fit some of them into 'the war on terror' - but the attitude for years has been that African lives are not as newsworthy as lives just about anywhere else on the planet. I say this as a white person who spent her childhood in Africa and is still astonished at how little many people know about the continent.

    To be honest, I think that ignorance is a big part of the problem: give a European journalist a story about Africa and he or she will often not have the first idea where to begin. Or if he or she does know where to begin, the next issue is how much info the audience will need. It's just easier to write about, ooh, I don't know, an outrageous magazine front cover, or a politician's sex life....

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    1. I accept that; but that moves on to a different issue of diversity in the media. If a Caucasian European can't write a story about Africa; Surely a major news organisation should be able to hire someone of African Decent? Example i saw an article on Black Face on the BBC. The article attempt to write about an issue that the write whom wasn't black obviously had no understanding of. I've written posts about women but i would pretend to know more about women's issue than an actual woman. Thus for me to write a point on a specific issue i would either ask a woman or simple ask her to write the post herself.

      With that said, your point is true. A lot of people not just journalist do not understand africa or any continent/country or region outside of their own. However, we do understand death and tragedy. You do not need degree level of knowledge to show acknowledgment.

      Thanks for your comment

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    2. I wasn't excusing the ignorance, Antoine: I think it's shocking. I sometimes read stuff in the paper and think, surely it can't be hard to find someone who knows something about this... There are plenty of educated Africans out there who could write a decent article. You do sometimes now get Africans reporting on African issues in the western media, which is a step in the right direction.

      Good luck with your blog.



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  8. The 'media-created narrative' that you speak of is, I believe, a true and sad fact. Personally, I struggle with seeing ANY deaths because I feel so horrified that humans can be so inhumane and I feel so helpless... but I will share this story, even though it is a painful one, because maybe... just maybe... it may help change the social media narrative.

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    1. Yes. Death and violence are very painful subjects. If you go to my Facebook page or google plus page. I give an explanation on why people find it hard to share such subjects www.facebook.com/antoinefitnessmodel or AntoineSpeaks google +

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  9. I don't know what news outlets you view, but every news site I visited had this attack on their front page, in fact the BBC still has an article relating to this attack on the front page.
    Honestly I completely disagree with your view that social media should be jammed with these news items, social media is for information about my social circles and I wouldn't want it spammed with news items that I'm already aware of.

    Social Media shoud be for information about my friends and family
    News sites should be for worldwide news.

    If you're unhappy with how the news is reported, start a movement around that. Don't use pathetic click bait titles such as "Most People won't share this because...." and then post it to Facebook. You're just part of the problem of people apathetically posting articles for 'awareness' and thinking it helps.




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  10. I wrote a wise and profound comment here, then I clicked "Preview" to read it again, then it just simply vanished. All that effort for naught! Please check why the Preview button just wipes out people's hard work!

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  11. Testing the Preview function ...

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    1. Yay, I found the text again. No problems. Ignore the two posts above. : )

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  12. Racism is real. One of the biggest reasons for racism is happening right now in South Africa. The country is being taken over by a small elite of incredibly corrupt and selfish people, led by the incredibly corrupt president Zuma. Their intent is to get control of a system of thievery that is taking control of all SA's resources and services. They are moving very quickly to a dictatorship. Ex-president Mbeki's brother wrote an article about how these elite politicians destroyed the youth's education system, because they realized educated people won't vote for the insanely corrupt system that these people are putting in place. The result is a votership of incredibly ignorant people who simply yawn when the most shocking abuses of power destroy the last vestiges of democracy. SA is being turned into another Congo, yet another African murder hole led by yet another Mobutu Sese Seko - and the world's bankers love it because now their mining companies can get the minerals for much cheaper (why pay the whole country when you can just pay the corrupt elite?). My point is, Africa's biggest hope for a healthy democracy with a large middle class is being destroyed by a corrupt leadership and ignorant voters. This destruction is why many non-Africans see Africans as an inferior race. If you, like me, want to embarrass these racists, we need to start a massive media campaign to pressure the world's governments to put pressure on SA's government to get rid of this obviously corrupt elite, and to replace it with competent people who give a sh*t about the people of South Africa. This campaign needs to be even bigger than the campaign against Apartheid, because once a dictatorship is in place, it will cause the Congo effect, and it takes centuries to fix the socio-political-economic damage and grief caused by the Congo effect. Please help save South Africa from tyranny, please help fight the racism that African tyrants cause!

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  13. We are as shocked as you are. We’re grieving for our brothers and sisters in Africa, the victims of the awful mass-murders in Garissa. But what makes us even more enraged is the lack of Western media coverage on the assaults. We are wondering, where is our world leader summit for mourning the 150 Kenyan students? Do we only care about terror that happens in our backyard?

    Also, in times of terror we must remain united. There’s no “us” and “them”. There’s just us, the human kind. We have to fight against terrorism but also remember not to judge whole religion by it’s extremist.

    Here's our statement: http://sonk.fi/charlie-hebdo-vs-garissa-university-the-western-double-standards/

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you for your post and the time you have taken to blog your opinion; i will check out your blog now.

      Delete
  14. One of the biggest reasons for racism is happening right now in South Africa. The country is being taken over by a small elite of incredibly corrupt and selfish people, led by the incredibly corrupt president Zuma. Their intent is to get control of a system of thievery that is taking control of all SA's resources and services. They are moving very quickly to a dictatorship. Ex-president Mbeki's brother wrote an article about how these elite politicians destroyed the youth's education system, because they realized educated people won't vote for the insanely corrupt system that these people are putting in place. The result is a votership of incredibly ignorant people who simply yawn when the most shocking abuses of power destroy the last vestiges of democracy. SA is being turned into another Congo, yet another African murder hole led by yet another Mobutu Sese Seko - and the world's bankers love it because now their mining companies can get the minerals for much cheaper (why pay the whole country when you can just pay the corrupt elite?). My point is, Africa's biggest hope for a healthy democracy with a large middle class is being destroyed by a corrupt leadership and ignorant voters. This destruction is why many non-Africans see Africans as an inferior race. If you, like me, want to embarrass these racists, we need to start a massive media campaign to pressure the world's governments to put pressure on SA's government to get rid of this obviously corrupt elite, and to replace it with competent people who give a sh*t about the people of South Africa. This campaign needs to be even bigger than the campaign against Apartheid, because once a dictatorship is in place, it will cause the Congo effect, and it takes centuries to fix the socio-political-economic damage and grief caused by the Congo effect. Please help save South Africa from tyranny, please help fight the racism that African tyrants cause!

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    Replies
    1. Why would you call the 'many non-Africans who see Africans as an inferior race', racists? when the example you give shows quite clearly that they are lacking something, when then let a small group of corrupt 'elite', rob them of the fantastic amount of resources that could give the whole of SA a chance of a proper life with education and health care...No one likes to see a corrupt leadership thrive...But its up to the SA citizen's to prove they are brave, intelligent and democratic, until now there is no sign of any of the 3....

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  15. What you say is true. When the attack in NIgeria happened but was totally over-shadowed by events in Paris, I wrote this poem. It was published on line. It was seen but maybe not by as many people as you or I would like:


    The Quiet Ones

    We are whispers
    red with a loss
    that soaks the soil
    of the poor lands,
    the ones that fail
    to serve.

    So we stay as whispers
    that straggle,
    struggle to reach
    cocked ears
    of the conscientious
    and we wait,
    long-suffering,
    for them to
    howl.

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    Replies
    1. Thank you for sharing our poem; it is very fitting.

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  16. Antoine, I know in Australia we have all been shocked by this evil act of terror. It was front-line news on the television - friends, family, and colleagues have all felt saddened by the loss of so many innocent young students just going about their daily lives. The internet has opened our eyes to all that happens in this world and I can assure you that regardless of where they happen these acts do not go unnoticed across the globe anymore. Hopefully as the world gets smaller solutions can be found to stop these atrocities and all other forms of hatred and prejudice.

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  17. Yall got any of those cat videos here?

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    1. Heh cat video guy ,please don't,I'm glad you read this though

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  18. Q: Trying to find a single notation about the word "ISLAM". None. Maybe I missed it.
    The blog contained "Al-Shabaab", "Boko Haram" "Charlie Hebdo attack (France by Al-Qaeda Yemen)", and even dares to post "Yet, the world does what to combat, acknowledge, condole or seek retribution for their murders? " Why not point at the source of the problem? Why not mentioned "islamic *******" as the origin of this killing free?
    When you can't point to the problem, how you going to even care about it?

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    1. That is fair point. I purposely didn't mention "islam" because religion can be used to unite people for good or evil. Just as nationalism, just as any similarity in thinking, ethnicity, belief, etc etc. It is a rallying cry. If it were simply the religion itself then the billion of muslims around the world would also be committing atrocity. So just as i don't blame Christianity for Slavery. I don't blame Islam for terrorism. I look at people; not books. Everyone is in charge of their own agency. People use religion as an excuse to justify actions they would have the intent to do anyway. Evil is evil. It isn't found in one religion or people in particular.
      So i care about the people affected by evil rather than the weak justification by the perpetrators.

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  19. It is hard to comprehend that people care more about their selfies and Kim Kardashian's ass than they do about the pain and sufferring that people are going through throughout the world. This planet has become very selfish and delusional. I appreciate your article andi know people will skip it because it's not about them, but I hope that the message will get through to some. That's all we can do now. Just hope.

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    1. Hope is all we have in these times. But i think of one quote "be the change you want to see"

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  20. And still I have a problem with the tag "most people"...certainly not most people I know...certainly none of my friends....I live in the UK...this atrocious item of news was and still is widely covered...how would sharing a terrible photograph on my facebook page aid the capture of the culprits? Be active with your politicians, yes, accuse "most people" of indifference, frankly no.....

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    1. Most people. Not all people. Not Everyone. But most. Most people ignore so much each day it's unbelievable. Have you actually stopped and watched a homeless person before. Watch how "most people" walk past them. How most people won't give them even a smile or a hello. But on to this post. I live in the UK too; so i am fully aware of the disparity in coverage and reaction between the different atrocities i have mentioned. MAYBE you are lucky enough to have a group of friends whom are conscious of other people's lives. Which in fact is proven by you being here in the first place. One of your friend was compelled to share this. Which made you come here. But the best thing you could comment about was the title. Which is both of our faults. Such is the nature of the internet. People would rather comment about something pedantic than share the opinion on the subject matter.
      But to answer your point; sharing these horrible images. Can show your friends/associates/peers etc etc whom didn't share a news story related to this that something REALLY REALLY SADDENING IS HAPPENING. And each one of us especially in the UK should be thank ourselves just how luck we are to live in safety.

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  21. Code of decency in photo journalism, you shouldn't show photos of the slain. Each one of them have family. Would you want to see a photo of your slain family member used for sensationalism? It's not right. Shameful.

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    1. Personally, i would not want my death to be silenced. I would want other to react and do something to stop other people falling to my fate. ALSO i took this photos from Conventional Media Sources; i obviously did not take them myself so your photo journalism point is some what invalid. But with that said i do understand some people do not wish to see the pictures of tragedies. But ignoring the pictures do not make the story disappear.

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  22. I'm curious. Do Africans care what happens to people in England, the EU, or America? Nope. Do they care about the thousands of young black and hispanics that are killed in American inner cities every year? Nope!

    I'm not saying that is the way it should be, but I will say this. MILLIONS OF DOLLARS IN AID (food, money, medicine, etc..) are sent to Africa every year. How many visas and scholarships are granted to African students to attend schools in Europe and America?

    What is this garbage about African lives don't matter to first world nations?

    How about a 'THANK YOU'? Just once. I want to see a post saying "We would like to thank for the first world nations for all the help they've given us over the years despite the fact that our governments are so corrupt and steal the aid before it ever reaches us."

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    1. 1. So your point is they supposedly don't care about us so we don't need to care about them?
      2. Billions of dollars of resources are exploitively taken from Africa countries at a fraction of their market value. Billions of dollars natural and human resources were taken from Africa historically i.e. slavery and the gold rush. The west is barely touching the iceberg of what it owes the continent.
      3. Thank you for what? Expenses scandal, back hand lobbying, and all kind of corruption exists in the West. Lets look at yourselves before we point fingers.
      4. What has that all got to do with the death of these students; so you can't care/share or give a damn because you believe their continent is receiving aid, their leaders are corrupt and they haven't said thanks... They can't thank you for all your benevolence from the grave can they?
      How about you read a few development books on Africa. Then Watch this video on why charity doesn't actually work.. Then read The Bottom Billion by Paul Collier, Then read any book on The Gold Rush, Slavery and the Money the British Empire made from Africa... Then reply
      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hpAMbpQ8J7g

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  23. Humbled to my knees please know that not everyone in the world is accepting of these actions many will not be silent, the world is changing, please give us time to catch up to such barbaric cruelty. Please keep writing you are a voice for the people.

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  24. I read this article from start to end, but I almost didn't. It was the combination of the title and the picture. Although the picture is real and devestating, I wouldn't want it posted for the world to see if it were one of my family or friends. I think it's a disrespectful image to honor the lives of the people lost. This is my opinion, and I don't deem it right or wrong; just one perspective to share. While I agree with the points you make, I to think there's more proactive ways to stir up a movement.

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  25. How dare you tell me what I can and can not look at on social media. You have no right to tell me what I am wasting my time on. If I want to look at cat videos I will. If I want to share something I will. A lot of people use social media to escape every day life and unwind. You have no idea what news sites people visit and just because they don't share a story does not been they don't care. Get off your high horse. Just because you wrote a bad article doesn't mean you care any more than anyone else.

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    1. And you click on this blog because... The title most likely so you either clicked on to make this point or because you care. But if you cared you have allowed this point to be more poignant in your mind than speaking about the actual subject; does that sound like a worth while decision?
      Enjoy your cat videos; like i say in the video i love fitness videos. BUT imbetween doing what we love every so often we should be able to spare a thought for someone other than ourself or someone we know. You are acting like you are in the HURT LOCKER and your daily life is so intense and stressful that you can't spare a moment to post a public thought on something other than yourself. Like i say in the video do as you please. But the fact i sat down and shared my opinion kind of does show i care. The fact your only opinion is defending your cat videos shows what you care about... each to their own. You wrestle your conscious and i will sleep easy with mine

      Delete
  26. The question now is Antoine, how do you stop this post, like so many thought provoking and moving posts from others before yours, from disappearing into the abyss of the internet? How do you be different? What is it to be the change? These articles are moving, and they stir hearts, but they never stick. I'm not trying to null and void your efforts... kudos to you for standing up, but we need something different to awaken the people. Old tactics don't work anymore. We need new ones.

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    1. Very good point; to which i am not sure what the answer is.
      As i spoke with my friend today, we said some people just want to stay in the Matrix. You can only unplug as many minds as are willing to accept that the world is sick. Then you can only hope those minds come together and think of a solution together.

      Delete
  27. this is a poignant and all too true account of what has been happening throughout Africa for decades. It's hard to understand why so much media attention is directed at attacks in other parts of the world, but literal genocides in Africa get so little. I have been following- and feeling helpless- about the state of sexual abuse against women in the Democratic Republic of the Congo for so long, and the statistics are mind boggling and nauseating. How the media glare has failed to shine a light on the brutalities that women endure leaves me speechless and so freaking angry......

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  28. I resent the implication that white folks don't care about blacks! It's horrible to judge a WHOLE RACE by a few! I care!! However, this incident is TRAGIC AND DESPICABLE as are all murders! Don't forget, in this incident and many other terror attacks... blacks are the perpetrators here against blacks. The REAL QUESTION is why are CHRISTIANS being targeted!!??

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    1. Mom,
      Westen demographic is no longer just white. Hence why no where do it say "WHITE PEOPLE THINK AFRICANS DON'T MATTER". I am from the West. Obviously, i am black thus black people and people of all races reside in the west now...
      Your point about black on black crime is irrelevant here. That's like me calling World War 1 white on white crime...
      Your christian point is a fair point. That has an in-depth answer that i'm not qualified enough to give. Are there actions an attempted region genocide? A person could put that argument forward quite easily. As to why that is, it could be said that there goal is to gain numbers, followers, fanatics and people willing to submit to their way of thinking. Someone of an opposite religion may not be willing to do all of those things. They may also be trying to scare everyone into joining them. Lots of different theories. You would do well in doing your own research on the issue.

      Delete
  29. I actually shared this picture / news story stating how sad our world has become before you did your blog on here...you make it look like we dont care because it is africa when you look to gain shares and comments from guilt on a blog. I just wish people were so generous in aid and support for those who need it as they are eager pressing a share button

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  30. The reason the West does not care (governments that is, not the people who most certainly care) is that there is no percentage in getting involved, no profit or oil. There is also the apartheid era in South Africa to consider and the memories of that time. The most abominable thing a western politician can be called is a racist and they live in fear of it as there is no greater vote loser. A child murderer or paedophile would lose less votes because of the way that the PC brigade have brainwashed people. Link that with the way that many oil rich countries have bought and paid for their western politicians and expect them to toe the line and not criticise islam in any way. In fact there are laws being brought in all over Europe to prevent any criticism under the guise of "islamophobia". If it had been Christians killing moslems it would not be off the front pages and the UN would sooner or later think about doing something, as it is, and as you say they will do absolutely nothing to help these poor innocent people.

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  31. No, most people won't share that picture because it's utterly disrespectful. Those are people's loved ones and it's not fair to their families. African lives matter...that's why we won't share!

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  32. What has happened in Garissa is shocking.. as was Westgate. How can you come in and shoot innocent people. These terrorists are pure evil. If they are really concerned about what is happening in their country, why don't they go back to their own countries and rebuild them? .. but no .. they want to go and spend blood money / poaching money buying arms, training etc. Why not put something back into their own country? ... These people want to live in other peaceful countries and cause the same havoc there as they have done in their own place!!!

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  33. Yes.. the world should be concerned about what is happening in Africa.. what these evil terrorists are doing. However. why the demands that western leaders march in solidarity with Africa when something like this happens? When it happened in France .. the French Leaders and neighbouring leaders marched in protest. When it happens in Africa do the African leaders march together? I have not seen Uhuru Kenyatta and his Tanzanian and Ugandan counterparts come and stage a march?? Why should the western leaders come to do this if African leaders themselves can just make a speech about how they are 'angry' about what has happened? How many times will this happen before the corrupt African leaders actually do something to protect their people.... without immediately asking the West to come solve their problems!! Africans you are a strong peolpe!!! Start taking responsibility and protecting your own land and people!!!!!

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  34. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

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  35. 'A stone tossed into an already raging sea makes no impact, yet a stone tossed into an otherwise still lake makes a huge long-lasting impact to it's stillness.'


    All lives matter - irrespctive of nationality.


    However the harsh reality is that when deaths occur horrifically, closer to home, in a setting where horrific deaths are not common... it makes more of an impact. The west, with our relatively long-standing, stable and trustworthy establishments, our institutions and organised government and police departments is an otherwise relatively 'still lake'.. until a 'stone' like the recent occurance in Paris is tossed into it. It is an afront to all that we hold dear - and are USED to, and have been used to for so very long.


    The sad reality is that many African, middle and far-eastern countries are much further away from us - both goegraphically, and in their 'normal' existence of life and in how their governments and establishments are set up and operate.


    Put bluntly... we're a lot more accustomed to hearing of such horrors from those places.


    Sadly, it is also the reality that it is a lot more difficult to relate to people groups and nations with whom we.. well.. don't relate, in so many ways. Yet when something happens to people with whom we DO relate, who dress like us, drive the same cars as us, with whom we can easily see ourselves a part of... and to whom are geographically a lot 'closer to home'... then it hits us harder.


    It's not that anybody has an agenda 'against' peoples from these far-off lands... it's just that cancer, for instance, is just a word.. until it strikes in our families - which is often what it takes for people to stand up and do something to help fight it.


    So whilst I absolutely think and pray for (..and i mean that..) people such as those affacted by events in Kenya and Nigeria... at the same time.. i think we need to grasp the above principle and it being 'why' these events further afield don't seem to impact quite so much.

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    1. Your point is Subjective and Objective violence. It is a concept that Zizek talks about.
      We categorise violence into the expected(objective) and the unexpected(subjective) thus some people see Africa as expected. When i believe that is a wrongful thought. We most value all lives. Doubly value that we are lucky enough to be safe in the west (to an extent). Use that valuing to show support to those that aren't safe.

      Delete
  36. If Charlie Hebdo had not happened there would be a big thing over this, similar to the failed "bring back our girls" but now there's burn-out. Which means the purpose of this disingenuous "won't share" is for Antoine to feel superior by making others feel guilty.

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    1. IF... We live in a world of reality; rather than your counterfactual. BUT IF you feel guilty then that is between you and your own conscious. I merely asked people to look at what they use the gift of the internet for. And how they go about connecting with people and show empathy. FYI like every single comment here, whether positive or negative; your very presence on this post is either through your own guilt or you actually caring and wanting to understand why others do not... It's your choice which category you fall into.

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  37. Mate...its dark africa..its not new..its your no progrezz approach that keeps rearing its ungovernable head....common sense never prevails in your africa...only corruption and desperation....he who has gun is king....change your thoughts....bring peace and bring prosperity. ...TIA

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  38. I clicked not because of the title. The "probably won't share this" emotional blackmail makes me feel like a sheep if I DO share it. I would very much like to share this, I think your writing is, mostly, well thought through. But I won't share it because the pictures of the dead are disrespectful to them and take away their dignity. I agree that the "Je suis Charlie" was very western-centric but someone, somewhere thought up that slogan. Sadly, you do need to "market" the plight of others in a selfish world. In the Western world Christians get little or no respect for their faith so it is not just because the victims were African. The world needs to wake up to the pursecution of Christians as a group, then perhaps their reaction will be less geo-centric. Good wishes, Mark.

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  39. I read your whole blog but wont be sharing yes it is very sad and has had media coverage but i also think it is disrespectful for the families whom have lost their loved ones

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  40. As a Kenyan, I have no problems with your frame of mind when writing this article or even the title, as it paints a fair picture of how the world vies Africa. What i do have a problem with is the use of that first picture. Even if you were going for some form of shock therapy, imagine if this blog goes viral and the parents of one of the victims identifies their child in this pic, lifeless and bloody. Ethics man. I dont think it helps matters to circulate such grotesque images. The international community will look at it, go 'how fucked up is Kenya' and moved swiftly along. Kenyans will look at it, be overcome with fear and look at every Somali apprehensively after. I get that you're of the view that it might stir us into action, but ask yourself, where there any pictures going round of the 41 kids killed in the Syrian bombing of a school last year?

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    1. Dear Paul,
      I respect what you have said. I will answer your point but i will have to simple say what i said to one of your compatriots.
      Ask the internet how many people know of those Syrian students? Why because words alone in the age of multimedia rarely makes an impact like a video or a picture. Your "how f*cked up Kenya" point isn't how i think people have reacted. Some people are showing a level of care. Some people are sharing. But please read my response to someone else

      Dear Corrie,
      i respect all that you have said. And i offer my deepest regret and sadness to the loss of your countrymen, students, people and the feeling of security and harmony that i hope once existed in your beautiful country.

      I will explain why i decided to post the images in as a respectful way as possible.

      As you know i am not Kenyan, therefore i did not take these images. Thus these images were/are readily available on the internet for all to be shocked by. And they should be shocked, appalled and feel sorrow for the families of these people. I included the images so there could be no question of the extent of this horrific attack. No question of the legitimacy of this event or this post. As you are aware the internet is thwart with fake posts and people whom do not believe what the media says. So there would be even more people whom would not believe what i am saying. Example there are plenty of people whom believe 9/11 didn't involve any planes despite footage to the fact.
      I included these images so these people did not die in vein. So that someone somewhere can see these images and think "i will not let this happen again". Think back to Rwanda where the world did nothing until it was too late. An image can change a policy. An image can provoke a reaction. An image can keep the memory of the victims alive and keep people seeking justice. Many images have changed the way the world has seen a conflict; words alone do not do that. From Vietnam, Iraq, World War 1/2, Rwanda, Kosovo, Torture by American forces, Shootings by police of unarmed civilians or the images of the beaten body of Steve Biko. Sometimes in order for change people need to be shocked.
      Also the images that i choose do not show one person in detail.

      But like i said i respect your opinion. And i can understand that this is a hard time for the families. But i would hope they understand that is my attempt to show support and help their cause for remembrance and justice.

      Delete
  41. I commend you for writing and sharing your thoughts on this horrible tragedy. From reading some of the comments from readers, it's clear they have shared their opinions too. Keep being bold in asking people to examine themselves and the ugliness of our society.

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  42. It is not 'Foreigners' who should be leading the protest ... it is the leaders of AFRICA... where is the African Union's outraged response? -- Where are the African leaders marching in unity against this vile act of cowardice... This happened on the continent of Africa.... Africans were massacred... Our African leaders must show that Africans matter - and the rest of the world will follow... It is time to stop turning to 'Foreigners' and take responsibility for our own.....

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  43. I have shared, I care, and always will.... I will shout, and try the best I can to stop this insanity..

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  44. I have not read the article...I will read it...i believe it is informative and triggers action. However as a Kenyan I am NOT comfortable with the images. Those that grossly display how the students were shot dead.Sensational articles always trigger an emotional action and a physical one at it. But the images will just destroy the families more. How would you feel when you saw a picture of your loved one displayed like this on social media. If a family would like to see such pictures so be it otherwise the sharing and circulation of such images is wrong.
    See a while back when the Alshabaab attacked yet other people in Westgate and Garissa Teachers images of the gross and cowardly act were shared..bloody images with emotional captions were all over on social media...yes they made us cry and protest but what do they do to the families. It was due to this that a LAW was passed on NOT sharing such gross images...some of our law systems are wrong...and sometimes..well most of the time if i feel like a law deprives me off my right i go against it...but thes sharing of gross images(even before it was passed as a law) I decided out of the HESHIMA(Respect) of families I will NOT share. The shoe does NOT FIT...so i don't know what sharing of such images would do to the loved ones.
    As a writer, I get where you are coming from and it is indeed important to create conversations that will make our leaders ACT...conversations that will get us NEW leaders who can fight these terrorists but these images NO...No...it hurts me to see that there are people who would be okay sharing these images.
    147 STUDENTS dying ...that...THAT in itself is a trigger and that is why the world stands with us in creating conversations around this number...today we go to commemorate these students at the freedom corner here in Nairobi...and we will not have these gross images there...just because we respect the families.
    I will NOT stop talking about such cowardly ACTS...I will campaign for change in our security..hell I will NOT vote for the same leaders come 2017...but i will NOT share these images.

    I would have shared your article but i have people on my social media timelines who lost their loved ones i dont want to keep showing them how they should remember their people. Your article once shared captures the first image...if it did not have images i would have shared. I know imagery does the trick in generating an audience..but this for me will not do. I would like to remember them with their smiles/laugh and who they were before the silly MANIACS CRAZY STUPID SICK alshabaab killed them.

    That said. I'm out.

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    1. Dear Corrie,
      i respect all that you have said. And i offer my deepest regret and sadness to the loss of your countrymen, students, people and the feeling of security and harmony that i hope once existed in your beautiful country.

      I will explain why i decided to post the images in as a respectful way as possible.

      As you know i am not Kenyan, therefore i did not take these images. Thus these images were/are readily available on the internet for all to be shocked by. And they should be shocked, appalled and feel sorrow for the families of these people. I included the images so there could be no question of the extent of this horrific attack. No question of the legitimacy of this event or this post. As you are aware the internet is thwart with fake posts and people whom do not believe what the media says. So there would be even more people whom would not believe what i am saying. Example there are plenty of people whom believe 9/11 didn't involve any planes despite footage to the fact.
      I included these images so these people did not die in vein. So that someone somewhere can see these images and think "i will not let this happen again". Think back to Rwanda where the world did nothing until it was too late. An image can change a policy. An image can provoke a reaction. An image can keep the memory of the victims alive and keep people seeking justice. Many images have changed the way the world has seen a conflict; words alone do not do that. From Vietnam, Iraq, World War 1/2, Rwanda, Kosovo, Torture by American forces, Shootings by police of unarmed civilians or the images of the beaten body of Steve Biko. Sometimes in order for change people need to be shocked.
      Also the images that i choose do not show one person in detail.

      But like i said i respect your opinion. And i can understand that this is a hard time for the families. But i would hope they understand that is my attempt to show support and help their cause for remembrance and justice.

      Delete
  45. Dear Antoine,

    Thank you for your article. I would be very grateful if you expanded on your meaning of 'action' triggered by social media.

    I agree with you that not all events are covered, debated, shared and cared about. There are no doubts about that. But my question is " Does a number of 'likes', shares and protests actually lead to anything?". I see social media as an upgraded version of old media which aimed to inform, provoke, call for an action. However, perhaps bit sceptically, I see lots of noise but no follow up (think of #bring our girls back). Each case comes with its context, its issues and complex entanglement of multiple forces and comments to your article show that. There are many ideas and views onto how this could have been prevented, solved and fought back.

    However, if I got your message correctly, you are focusing on the potential of social media. Therefore I am looking forward to your reply or a longer article on the real (read transformative) potential of social media.

    On a personal level, I cannot imagine the pain. And sometimes it is easier for me not to feel it. Are we tought how to grieve with and for others? I leave it as a rhetorical question.

    Best wishes,

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  46. good article. I grew up in Africa....there is so much cruelty imposed on the people by their tyrant leaders that events like this just seem to be a variation on a theme. in the west their is more effective democracy and law maintenance. that's why people react more in the west, because events like this are not the norm. the problem, I believe, lies in the African male culture. selfishness has no limit...it oppresses, intimidates even kills for satisfaction. change that and you change Africa. change Africa and people will think of it differently. but don't blame democratized-social-media people in the free world!

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  47. Sorry Antoine, but that is not the reason. These are real people sons and daughters brother and sisters, mothers and fathers too I am sure and the picture is just too graphic and unnecessary - we can all guess what the aftermath of a massacre looks like and I feel reposting it is, in some way, doing disrespect to the families and friends who have to carry the pain and horror of it. We didn't re-post pictures of the bodies slain in the Paris massacre and I don't think we should here either. Share the story, as we must and as I have done, but let us show some respect for the dead

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    1. 1. This whole blog has two pictures which don't show anyone's face in detail; yet that is the only point you took from it...
      2. The events in France were recorded. That video was played on national media round the clock. So if you shared anything to do with it most likely would have included the actual footage of their deaths.
      3. This images weren't taken by myself; hence making them readily available on the internet/small sub headlines on news sites.
      4. Shocking images are reflection on shocking events. Massacres/atrocities come in many different forms. Sometimes people need to be shocked by the images so they can see the extent of the evil in the world. To see people literally in their class room as they were gunned down.
      5. "A picture is worth a thousand words". Some people need a picture to react to; because some people doubt words. With that said even words can be more powerful than pictures if the person is empathetic and believes the story. Example Read the description of the 3 Israeli Men whom kidnapped and burnt a Palestinian 13 year old. http://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2014/11/17/one-state-reality
      6. Photo Journalism from war zones and conflicts are some of the biggest driving force for change and public condemnation. One need only think back to the little girl running naked in vietnam; "The last jew of Vinnista"; Images from 9/11; images from world war 1/2 trenches; the images that eventually came out of Rwanda, image of the Monk Setting himself alight, The images of the torture committed by American forces in Iraq ETC ETC. Pictures can bring home just how horrific an event is
      7. You speak for the Kenyan families with as much knowledge of their thoughts as myself. SO it is my opinion that they would rather the memory of their loved ones lived on. And there tragic deaths meant something. IE people are shocked into showing support, caring, emphasising, writing, campaign or simply not waisting time debate of pictures when there is a bigger issue at hand...
      So no, you are naive to think people aren't sharing the story due to picture that are readily available on the internet. I watch a man get gunned down by a policeman today on the internet. People need to see what the hell is going on in the world.
      Sorry Crawford, for so abruptly bring you out of your matrix of naivety; If people didn't share or talk about the Kenyan Student Massacre; it wasn't too do this the pictures!

      Delete
  48. I liked your article!

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  49. I shared and replied to your article.
    Most people won't read it though because working class white boy's opinions do not matter.

    https://m.facebook.com/story.php?story_fbid=10153204273499985&id=775889984&ref=bookmark

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  50. I'm not that active on the internet, usually post a reply to something like this once a year only, and being anon suits me fine. I'm a Buddhist and I like my FB page updated with videogame news, rock music news, and sometimes stuff like what you're saying. I don't think any of this will make a difference ultimately - I mean you saying we have to speak out about this on FB. Maybe I'm wrong, I'm not that clever. There's enough negativity I make for myself on a daily basis that I can't even control, let alone some psychos in another country. I did once share a documentary on FB about ISIS who I think are the worst. The way they live over there is sick. I also spoke out about the French thing on FB too. This tragedy now is terrifying. But I believe in Samsara anyway, so I'll be dead and gone before people change! Anyway, I think overall, I mean well, but there's too much to "save" in such a short life, stay where you are and fix the problems you make for yourself, defend yourself and your family and make change where you live.

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  51. Antoine...do you actually CARE about these poor people? I think you do in general terms, but not about them as individuals. If you did, you would not share the photos of their horrific death with such a cavalier attitude. Those are someone's loved ones...not a talking point. If it were my child and you splattered these images across the internet for effect? Well, let's just say it would not go well...

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  52. Antoine my man, I'm giving you a Bells for this one. The world is more twisted now than ever before. The real question is: what do we do about it? I mean, sure I can share this on my wall and hold discussions about it along with other devastating news around the world. But talk is cheap of late. What can we do?

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    1. Not sure what you are talking about. The world is improving everyday. Medicine, technology, and science... Pretty sure the farther back we go in time, the worse the world is. Shit happens. Be thankful it wasn't you. Move on, or move to Africa.

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    2. Not sure what you are talking about. The world is improving everyday. Medicine, technology, and science... Pretty sure the farther back we go in time, the worse the world is. Shit happens. Be thankful it wasn't you. Move on, or move to Africa.

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  53. I really wish there was something more tangible and active and purposeful that I could do other than share a video that most people will scroll past. I say they will scroll past it, not because the lives don't matter and they don't want to do something, but because I believe most people are so saturated by the astonishing amount of evil and depravity in this world, that one can become paralyzed. At the end of your speech you say you do not have the answers, but together we can do something. Ok. Great....I think you are in the same boat as the rest of us. I am a mom, raising 5 kids. I am teaching them to love others and give generously, and to hopefully grow up to give and serve rather than just sit around waiting for others to serve them. I have read more articles about tragic acts done to humans of ALL races and colors all over the world than is probably good for my sanity. Why? Because I DO care, because I want to DO something and not just sit around and wait for someone to do it for me. But let me ask you this.... WHAT do I do for those students in Africa, for the refugees in Syria, for the victims of hurricanes in Vanauatu, for the thousands of children in Vietnam and Cambodia that are sold into slavery for heinous sexual acts, for the millions of foster kids in this country (U.S.) who will probably never get adopted...etc. etc. etc. ???? I ask God every day to show me how to love others on His behalf, to be his hands and feet to serve and love, and to raise my own family to do the same. I would just for once love it if there was an actual answer to these problems and how someone like little old me can do anything about it. So I look around my neighborhood, which has enough heartache and brokenness in just a four block radius and I try to bring light and love here. I am thankful that you posted your feelings, but its just frustrating to me that people say "no one is doing anything, no one will share this video, no one cares" ...well, I care. But if someone could tell me how I can help from 5000 miles away, that would be great. :) We donate to relief organizations, sponsor children through World Vision, support missionaries, and give to our church to support their out reach locally. (All of that on a single income, mind you...not a six figure one either, but it doesn't matter because its God's money and we give it back to Him ) My point is....what else can an average person do? Please, if you have answers, I would love to hear them.

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  54. I think I'm going back to my cat videos. Next time, don't sound so damn insulting in your article. Then maybe I would share it.. or maybe, like most normal people, I don't want photos of dead people on my Facebook.

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    1. Sorry that leaving the Matrix of Cat videos was so alarming for you.
      BUT your point about the pictures only proves that you haven't been following the story as if you had you would have seen these images already... but i am glad you are now aware. And whether you like the post or not you now have an opinion about someone/something other than yourself and those cats.
      FYI life isn't all rose, kittens and smiles. Sometimes people need to be told cold, uncomfortable and angry truths. I could share with you a post about the Death of Palestinian boy that has no pictures but the words are so graphic you would with you could only just look at a picture. But you most likely wouldn't care to read it anyway... such is the internet. such are people. But atleast you clicked on this post
      Not sure what you expected to see...

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  55. I think I'm going back to my cat videos. Next time, don't sound so damn insulting in your article. Then maybe I would share it.. or maybe, like most normal people, I don't want photos of dead people on my Facebook.

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  56. Ha! I, too, hate things that say "Most people won't share this", and tell me I have to or I am not a decent person. The only reason I opened the link, was because there was an excerpt from a comment with the link, and I thought the article might echo my feelings about the guilt topic. Am I sickened by murder- yes, yes, yes. Sometimes I can't sleep at night because of the sick things I have tried to be informed of and inform others of. Look at my wall if you need proof of my interest in positive change. But I don't share things because someone else tells me to. It's a free world and coercion of any kind annoys me.

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    1. This post isn't about what annoys you is it? It's about a wider issue of people's apathy. IF you are someone whom cares then good for you. I am not sure why you needed to give justification for your sharing; if you in fact do share issues/news stories. The post and the points made are to enlighten people. But it is a little stranger that you only clicked on a post that speaks on wide range of topics that need stop be discussed; but the only thing you could comment about is the title.

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  57. Those lives need to matter in the country of Kenya first then let's have the discussion outside Kenya. Africa needs to start giving a damn about Africa first then take your discussion elsewhere. I confess I live in the greatest country in the world I don't feel bad and I am not apologizing to anybody for saying this. My country is great because good people fought, died and believe freedom is most important to all people. I got your message and yes ALL Lives Do Matter.

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